Top Highlights on Daniel Mark Harrison

Daniel Mark Harrison is a successful author, businessman, and entrepreneur. He graduated from the University of Oxford, where he earned a bachelor of arts in Theology. Daniel went ahead and attained a master’s in business administration at BI Norwegian Business School from 2005-2006 and a master’s degree in journalism. With all this information, he was determined that he had the skills to go places. He is currently the chairman and CEO of Daniel Mark Harrison & Co. He currently resides in Singapore, where he runs a family office. It does not stop there, Mr. Harrison is also a partnering with Blockchain Funding firm Monkey Capital and Fintech. The company is well known for providing unmatched services to all its customers. With the great partnership, the team has been able to provide the best in their field.

Daniel Mark Harrison was also a co-founder at Stanley Court Ltd for four years. The company is situated in Bangkok’s metropolitan area. At the company, he was crucial in marketing and fundraising. He also worked in Asian markets, an online platform where clients are provided with information online. Daniel also worked as head of private clients at St. Helens capital Plc. As seen earlier, he is also a writer; his works include Butterflies: the Strange Metamorphosis of Fact and Fiction in Today’s World and The Millennial Reincarnations. He has also contributed to publications such as Forbes, Thestreet.com, the wall journal, Portfolio magazine, BNET.com among others. He was the chief Editor in Marx Rand, which is a general news interest publication that focuses on exploring independent mind concepts.

Monkey Capital is his current project. Together they made history by being the pioneer in successfully selling pre-ICO options called COEVAL trading on waves Decentralised exchange. He even went a step ahead and acquired the domain name Monkey.com at a fee of $500,000; the site is set to provide the first 24 hours internet news. The company is rapidly becoming a leading name in Blockchain development. Monkey Capital has all the key elements of a successful crypto project. Its realistic plans and dedicated team will make certain that the company will expand its boundaries.

George Soros: His History of Philanthropy in Social and Political Matters

About George Soros

George Soros is a Hungarian-American business magnate. He is one of the richest investors in the world. He is estimated to be worth $25.2 billion.

History and Philanthropy

Soros philanthropic work is outstanding. He has made remarkable contributions to education, humanitarian, and governance through the Open Society Foundations and Soros Fund Management.

Education

In the 1970s, Soros started his focus in education in South Africa. He provided the funds for the black Africans at the University of Cape Town. He also played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Central European University in Budapest; he contributed $880 million to its endowment and served as its chairman until 2007.

Additionally, Soros has donated a lot of money to institutions in the former USSR. It is estimated that he has spent over $100 million in enhancing higher learning in the region.

Humanitarian Contributions

Soros has contributed to the improvement of the social welfare of individuals affected by war in different regions such as the former Yugoslavia. He has also championed against religious discrimination, international justice, security, and counterterrorism. This has been done through offering a total of $10 million to UNICEF and the International Crisis Group. His resolve to champion for human rights led to his recent contribution of $4 million to the Human Rights Institute of the University of Connecticut. Know more on businessinsider.com about George Soros.

Governance Involvement

Soros’ tremendous contribution to the growth of the worldwide democratic space cannot be overemphasized. He played a crucial role in easing the accessibility to information in Hungary; he distributed reading materials to universities, libraries, and social groups. He aimed at weakening authoritative leadership through the free flow of information. Additionally, Soros has supported political organizations such as the American Bridge and MoveOn.org

The Ferguson Protests

George Soros is at the center of the Ferguson Protests. According to interviews reviewed by The Washington Times, he donated approximately $33 million to support the civil activists, such as the Gamaliel Foundation, in Ferguson. He used his not-for-profit organization Open Society Foundation. The foundation propagated social justice among all the people. It worked with various organizations with a similar agenda. Its activities climaxed after Trayvon Martin was killed in Florida. The murder led to the development of the “Black Lives Matters” movement in the social media. The movement has been heavily funded by Soros.

Additionally, Soros donated $100000 to Ms. Tometi who led the Black Alliance for Just Immigration in 2011. His urge to ensure that all the individual are respected saw him spend a lot of resources to protest against unfair treatment of the minority. Read his profile at Forbes.

George’s Re-Emergence to Political Philanthropy

After a relatively long period of being away from political financial philanthropy, George Soros re-emerged as the major financier of the Democratic Party politics. An article published at the Politico indicated that he spent an estimated $25 million to finance the Hilary Clinton’s campaigns. He funded the Priorities USA Action, Immigrant Voters Win, and American Bridge 21st Century activities. He hoped to achieve maximum voter turnout to defeat Donald Trump.

Tim Armour Makes The Case For Active Funds

Warren Buffett has often said that passively managed funds are better than actively managed funds as they tend to have better returns. In an article that Tim Armour wrote for CNBC, he makes the case that this isn’t necessarily true. While Armour agrees that there are too many actively managed funds that are a disservice to their investors, he says that’s not always the case.

Tim Armour writes that active versus passive isn’t really the argument. Many mutual funds have poor returns due to excessive fees and trading. The key is to find actively managed funds that are low cost and keep trades to a minimum. Armour also says that the key to finding a good actively managed fund is finding those where the fund manager has a large part of his or her own money in it. He goes on to write that an overlooked problem with index funds is that they are completely exposed to market volatility and losses when the market inevitably have a downturn. He said that one of the best ways to grow your nest egg is to do better than others when the markets go down.

Read more on Crunchbase.

Tim Armour is the CEO and Chairman of the investment firm Capital Group, as well as a financial advisor. He has spent his entire 34-year career in the financial industry at Capital Group, having first joined the company in its The Associates Program after he graduated from college. Armour earned his degree in economics at Middlebury College.

Tim Armour has written other articles where he makes the case that you don’t need to settle for average returns. His advice is to have an active manager who “earns their keep”. If your money is in an active fund that is trailing the index, Armour’s advice is to find another fund manager.